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January 1999 Newsletter - Volume 2. Issue 17

Table of Contents

  • Back Then, by Nancy Pomer MB-F Data Processing Department

1998 MB-F, Inc.

You may use this paragraph as permission to reprint any article in the MB-F Newsletter providing 6rticles are printed in their entirety, proper credit is given to the author and to the MB-F Newsletter, and a copy of the publication in which it was reprinted is sent to the MB-F Newsletter, P.O. Box 22107, Greensboro, NC 27420. Opinions expressed by authors in this publication are their own and are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher. Publisher reserves the right to edit.

What does the President of a Dog Show Company Do?
by Bob Christiansen

In May 1981 I graduated from the University of South Carolina with a Master of Business Administration (MBA). I had a few job offers but nothing really appealed to me. I decided I needed a little break after six continuous years of college and graduate school. I moved with a friend to Hilton Head, South Carolina where we each got jobs waiting tables and planned to move to Houston, Texas in the Fall to get “real” jobs. I had unlimited golf privileges at the country club where I was waiting tables and the summer ahead looked great. I planned to play golf and hang out on the beach all day, wait tables in the evening, and drink beer and chase girls after work each night - Paradise!

Shortly after all this great fun was ready to begin, I made a phone call to a man named Tom Crowe. Well, you guessed it. The rest is history. I heard a few weeks earlier Mr. Crowe might have a job opening and I sent him a resume. I went to Greensboro for an interview and the next thing I knew I was hired. Mr. Crowe promised if all went according to his plan, I would one day be running the business. I didn’t really know if I should believe him but it sure looked like a great opportunity and a very interesting career. I knew nothing about dog shows and probably not a great deal more about running a large business but I was ready to learn. Looking back on it, Mr. Crowe must have really known something I did not.

My primary job from May 1981 until August 1985 was as a programmer/systems analyst. I wrote software for show contracts, settlements, accounting, payroll, premium lists, entry processing, typesetting, mailing, and all aspects of the business. I also developed software for the touch tone electronic entry/information system known as “ROLF”. I started going to dog shows and I also learned how to fly the company airplane. In 1985, Tom Crowe retired and named me President and CEO of MB-F, Inc.

There are no two days alike here at MB-F. I probably have the most interesting job in the world as the President of a Dog Show Organization like MB-F. My day-to-day duties involve all the things I learned in college and graduate school as well as things I never dreamed I would learn. When I was in school they never told me I would:

Work at dog shows
Attend a club dinner
Deal with the AKC
Write software S
urf the Internet
Deal with Personnel problems
Analyze new machinery and methods of production
Attend trade shows
Logistics coordinator for trucks, people and equipment
Find a lost catalog shipment somewhere in the United States
Set-up ring equipment
Set-up benching
Personally provide cleanup help
Talk to kennel clubs
Provide Customer service
Attend Board of Directors meetings
Set the course for the future of MB-F
Marketing for dog shows
Solve problems
Make thousands of mistakes in a matter of minutes
Become a Psychologist
Listen to employee personal problems
Celebrate employee birthdays
Go to employee funerals
Celebrate the birth of employee’s children
Really read financial statements
Follow the stock market
Make investment decisions
Deal with the US postal system
Deal with the airlines
Deal with IRS audits
Deal with accountants
Deal with attorneys
Drive a Truck
Evaluate contracts
Have lunch with executives on Wall Street
Write contracts
Negotiate contracts
Give lawsuit depositions
Evaluate and Purchase group health insurance
Evaluate and purchase property/ casualty/liability insurance
Hire new employees
Fire employees
Deal with unions
Wear jeans to work every day
Wear shorts to work in the summer
Reprimand employees who have not performed their work properly
Praise employees who have done a good job
Evaluate and Give employee raises
Tell employees there is no money for a raise at the present time
Promote employees to better jobs
Find cheaper ways to do things
Receive calls late at night that one of our trucks is missing
Receive call late at night that an employee is in jail.
Post bail
Fly instrument approaches down to minimums in the fog at Chicago O’Hare -
Fly a load of catalogs and show materials at the last minute to a dog show
Recognize any place in the United States from the window of an airplane
Attend and participate in MB-F inter-company team meetings.

When people unfamiliar with the dog business ask me what I do for a living I have to pause and reflect. Sometimes I simply say I am in the printing business and let it go at that to save a long explanation. Once I told an old high school acquaintance that I worked for a dog show company and he was “kind” enough to tell me what corporations in Greensboro might be hiring in case I was still looking for a “professional” job where I could use my education. Overall I love my job. I have the good fortune to work with some of the smartest and hardest working people in the world here at MB-F. Although many of my co-workers lack the formal education I have been lucky enough to receive, they are every bit as smart as the smartest people I shared classes with. The variety and complexity of challenges here at MB-F have constantly motivated me and I am sure I will work here for the rest of my professional career.

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After Retirement
By Tom Crowe

In February of 1985 I decided I had enough of the dog business and I wanted to relax in the sun and enjoy my remaining years. My mind was set on golf, lazy afternoons by a shimmering pool, and the good life with nothing to do except worry about what’s for dinner.

Wrong! One can only play so much golf and relaxing by the pool only leads to complete boredom. So what to do? Buy a boat and fish the many lakes around your chosen area of retirement. (Sucker!!!) If you have never owned a boat try it, you’ll love it. Oh, to sail the bounding main, but you will need a larger boat. It’s just not safe in a skiff when the ocean waves are four to six feet high. So buy a much larger boat.

Now enters the Coast Guard. If your plans are of high adventure without getting lost, the ocean is a big place. When you are out of sight of land heaven help you if you are not trained in the ways of an old salt.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary, a branch of the regular Coast Guard, offers training all the way to a regular licensed sea captain. So what now? Of course, join the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Makes sense doesn’t it? Woe be unto you. You are now really hooked. Attending classes, going on cruises, taking training on search and rescue, life saving, teaching others (civilians) about boating safety, meetings with the Coast Guard regulars. Then there’s cooperating with local and state authorities re surveillance of unlawful activities.

When you are fully activated you graduate to rescue at sea plus surveillance duties in cooperation with the Coast Guard and the DEA law enforcement activities. Wow, how did I ever get involved in all this? All I wanted was a little dinghy along with a bamboo pole with line and hook with no bait on it.

When it was discovered I was a licensed pilot my life in the Coast Guard changed. I became an Aircraft Commander and from there to the equivalent rank of regular Coast Guard Commander. My duties were much the same as they were with the boats except that I had command of all Auxiliary pilots and planes within the 7th Coast Guard District which is the largest district in the U.S. It comprises all of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. I was also assigned an additional duty of transporting Coast Guard VIPs to various required destinations. My primary passenger was the commandant of the 7th District, Admiral Richard Kramek, who later became the National Commandant of the Coast Guard and a member of the National Security Council. All-in-all owning a boat wasn’t such a bad deal. It took 11 years out of my so called retirement and gave me an adventurous time that I shall always remember and take pride in.

Now about the dog business and retirement, it just never really happened. I have been here all along. Never in the forefront because good loyal people are the core of MB-F. They run the business; I’m just an observer and a consultant when asked. I am as retired as I will ever be but dogs and dog shows never get out of one’s blood no matter how hard one tries. Golf and fishin’ just doesn’t cut it.

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Since When...
by Dorie Crowe

...has it become a crime to become successful in this sport? It makes no difference whether you’re an exhibitor, a breeder, a judge, a club, a professional handler or a superintending organization. It doesn’t matter if you have worked your collective tails off, done all your homework and then some, had a good idea, bred a good dog, handled a good dog, otherwise paid your dues in the sport, whatever, and attained some measure of success, there seem to be folks out there waiting to try to take you down. In some cases it’s done in a very subtle manner, in others it appears to be the more malicious the better.

Now, we are NOT saying there are no disreputable exhibitors, breeders, judges, handlers, etc. There are, however, a helluva lot more reputable ones than not. We ARE saying if you have any degree of success it seems you should expect there to be a rumor about you or your dog or pot shots at your breeding program or the way you handle your show or your business. Doesn’t matter it’s not true - they just appear to be so envious they can’t stand for anyone else to have success they don’t have. Sometimes they may not even be direct rivals; sometimes they may be trying to do a friend some good. Sometimes it appears to be garbage spread just for the sake of spreading or stirring; sometimes it’s the same people over and over again who have nothing good to say about those who experience success or try to do some good for the sport. Or, there is accusation after accusation. (Maybe it’s just that’s the way they conduct themselves so they assume everyone else must be doing the same.)

What does this say about the state of the sport these days? What does this say about some of the participants in the sport these days? Pretty sad state, ain’t it? Do we care? What if you’re the next target?

What can be done?

It seems to me the most important thing these folks need is someone to listen to them. We could probably do a lot of good just by following this little rule - if verbal or written “assassination” is taking place DON’T LISTEN, DON’T BUY IT. Consider what this person has to gain or for what reason they may be spreading gossip or accusatory information. Do they continually have negative things to say? Do they always pick on the same individual(s)? Is it that they didn’t get something they wanted? Is it always de-structive instead of con-structive?

We are not talking about the normal give-and-take or questioning that continuously goes on in dogs. After all, it’s by questioning we all learn. It’s by the exchange of information that ideas or improvements get refined; that changes for the better are accomplished. (As a personal note - when are we going to start recognizing the good that people do BEFORE they die? I’m so tired of hearing how wonderful people are after they’re gone. Wouldn’t it be nice to tell them a time or two while they’re still here to enjoy it? But, I digress...).

It appears to be a fact of life that in this day and time, the “exchange of information” has reached new lows. We are talking about the well-placed word, the sly innuendo, the passing along of rumor; the phrase with just enough information and the hope the listener will take it and run. And, we are also talking about the downright malicious things that get spread.

What do you think would happen the next time someone approaches you with “stuff” and you said, “I’m sorry, I just don’t want to hear talk of that nature. Let’s talk about something else.”? What do you think would happen the next time you are on a chat line and did the same thing? What do you think would happen if you ignored these folks? Yes, they will probably go to someone else, but if that person would do the same thing, pretty soon there would be no outlet for these people. They might get the message. They might reconsider what they are doing.

Would they stop? Maybe not right away. Certainly not as long as there was anyone willing to listen. BUT, if there was no one willing to listen or perpetuate, maybe, just maybe....

Pie in the sky? Wouldn’t hurt to try would it?

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CHICAGO

THE CANINE HEALTH FOUNDATION
OF THE AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB

Has set a reachable goal of $50,000.00 or more in donations resulting from the Chicago show on Saturday, February 27th, 1999. For starters Ralston Purina and the International Kennel Club have each pledged $5.00 for every adult dog entered in that show making a total of $10.00 per adult dog. That’s a very healthy start towards the goal.

If you gratuitously add a check made out to the Foundation for another $15.00 along with your entry the Foundation will add it to the above $10.00 and you will receive a membership certificate and a foundation pin all certifying you as a gift contributing member of the Foundation.

Come to the marvelous dinner on Saturday night after the show where you can dance on the water under the stars while the net proceeds of the dinner go to the furtherance of the cause of the Canine Health Foundation.

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IT’S 1999
By Tom Crowe

Can you believe it’s 1999? I can’t. Somewhere in 1997 I got off the beaten track and I have missed all of 1998. The fastest year of my life has passed me by. Maybe I have been too busy to notice what has been happening EXCEPT for Clinton and Lewinsky. Would you ever have believed the President of the United States could be involved in so much trash? I wonder who will play Lewinsky in the movie?? I assume we all know who will star in the leading role. He never misses any opportunity.

What I do know is the last 12 months have probably been the most productive of any year in the history of MB-F. InfoDog, as well, has made so many improvements in programming and development of new systems, that even though I have been involved, I find it hard to keep up. Each day brings forth new achievements and more things to benefit our customers. Have you looked into a “Show Chairman’s Dream? To say the least I am very proud of the many things the people of MB-F and InfoDog have brought to the “Wonderful World of Dogs”.

Soon you will be introduced to a new program constructed to proclaim the achievements of all that show dogs, whether it is for fun or for profit. It’s called “Winners & Bragging Rights”. We believe it will completely change your record keeping chores; Compile your point records; Provide you with a very inexpensive way of advertising your wins; Give you insight into what your competition is doing; Help you sell your puppies. It will extol your rights to brag about your breeding prowess as “Breeder of the Year”, your mastery of handling as “Handler of the Year” and your exhibitor experiences as “Exhibitor of the Year.

All of our elves are deeply involved in testing and bringing all of the loose ends together. The two chief Elves, Bob Christiansen and Jeff Trull, have been burning the midnight oil to make it all happen as soon as possible. It will be worth the wait and will be everything we say it will be. Remember the name, “WINNERS & BRAGGING RIGHTS”. COMING SOON TO A COMPUTER NEAR YOU!

 

We would like to

hear from you!

 

Do you have a question to Ask the Superintendent?

Just jot it down or email it to:

ASK THE SUPERINTENDENT

MB-F Newsletter

PO Box 22107

Greensboro, NC 27420

E-mail: mbf@infodog.com

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Little Did I Realize...
By Kim Strong Robinson MB-F Judging Program Department

As a Professional Handler of 24 years, I would receive my entry confirmations in the mail, make hotel reservations, then head off to that week’s destination using the motel listings and directions provided so conveniently for me in the MB-F judging programs.

Arriving on the showgrounds the morning of the event, I would buy a catalog and start the day of showing dogs, all the while keeping a judging program in my pocket. All day long I would refer to my judging program. I would win ribbons and at days’ end I would mark my catalog using the copies of the judges’ sheets posted at the Superintendent’s desk.

I have to admit I took for granted all the services MB-F provided. I never considered how much hard work went into managing and producing a dog show. I was a great critic, especially of judging programs.

Well, as fate would have it, changes in my life guided me to a new career. Similar but different. And — what a coincidence - you guessed it, I’m now writing judging programs for MB-F, Inc. shows. Now I understand!

There are many, many factors that enter into creating a judging program, let alone having it written in a timely manner. Can we get in touch with the Show Chairman quickly? How many rings can the site accommodate? Are there overloads? Can we solve the overload within the panel? Does the club need to hire a judge or judges? Can the judge chosen be reached right away? Once we have a judge to take the overload AKC must be contacted to approve it.

In the actual writing of the “JP” factors enter in such as special breed requests from either specialty clubs, Show Chairmen or exhibitors, breeds requiring much grooming versus little grooming, breeds that have problems with heat/cold, lunch schedules, how fast/slow a judge judges - the list goes on and on. All this requires a great deal of interaction with the club. After all, it’s their show.

When the JP is written it is sent to the typesetting department, then to proofreading. If there are corrections to be made it goes back to typesetting. When all is correct it goes on to be printed and then to be mailed. All is done to assure the club their show will run as smoothly as possible.

It took a lot of years for me to realize how much care, effort and expertise comes from MB-F. I am proud to say I was able to qualify for this special team.

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Back Then
by Nancy Pomer MB-F Data Processing Department

Thirty years ago, while living in New Jersey, my husband and I decided to adopt a German Shepherd puppy. Because she needed some training, my husband enrolled he and Gretchen in an obedience course. They did pretty well, so the instructor encouraged him to enter obedience matches. For several years we traveled around New Jersey, New York and New England competing in matches and later in AKC shows so that Gretchen could earn her CD degree. I remember that during those years we received in the mail booklets advertising dog shows from some company called Foley in Philadelphia.

One of my most vivid dog show memories is a match in Ramapo, NJ where we had entered Gretchen in a breed class just to see how she would do. (She got a fourth place.) As I was standing at ringside, a man pointed to her and said, “Is that a dog?” Stunned by his question, I indignantly answered, “Yes, she’s a German Shepherd.”

Years later in 1983 when I was looking for a computer programming job in Greensboro, NC, I obtained an interview with Bob Christiansen at a company called MB-F. When I pulled into the parking lot, there was a large dog head on the sign at the front and I wondered if this was some kind of laboratory until I was taken on what we call the nickel and dime tour. There in a hallway were boxes and boxes of those show advertisements I remembered receiving years ago. Premium lists, I learned they were called. I’m sure Bobby hired me because I was the only candidate who had any inkling of what a dog show was.

I’ve worked at MB-F for over 15 years now. Much of my job consists of computer programming but, as you know, Mr. Crowe and Bobby have a great interest in utilizing the newest computer technologies available. My job has never been boring as I have been constantly challenged learning new programming techniques and using the latest computers and equipment.

One example of this is our printing of armband numbers. In the 1980’s, our armbands were either printed at another printshop or usually on our offset printers by our pressmen. They were cut and stored in cubbies where Mr. Jim Mulvey would pull and sort them for every show.

When laser printers became available, a printer was found that could be adjusted to print large numbers on thick armband paper. At first we spent months struggling to improve the print quality by experimenting with the type of paper stock and getting the correct grain so that the paper would not jam. I spent much time literally pulling the paper through the printer while Mr. Mulvey tapped his cane impatiently while he waited for his armbands to print.

With our current printer, thanks to Jeff, which has the best laser technology, we have great quality armbands, no streaks and few printer jams.

There have been many changes in dog shows over the years as well. I’ve added to our files many new breeds, the Havanese and the Lowchen are the most recent. There are many more classes for dogs to be shown in, like the 12 to 18 Months Class, the Agility Classes, the Veteran Sweepstakes Classes, and the other day I added Field of Champions Sweepstakes Classes.

When I think of that man years ago in Ramapo, NJ, I am a little embarrassed because I know now that he was really asking me if Gretchen was a dog or a bitch.

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Guy's Corner
by Guy Walton

During my recovery from foot surgery I have watched more T.V. then I have in 20 years (new programs are really bad, cartoons are too violent and deep [give me the Flintstones, Jetsons, etc.]) Last night I saw a wonderful ice show with marvelous skaters. Scott Hamilton was unbelievable including 6 to 8 triple jumps (toe loops, axles, etc.), many double jumps, two Russian splits, one back flip and unsurpassable footwork. He was perfect. It is too bad we don’t have him for the Olympics.

Best Wishes

Rev. Jerry Watson called me on Friday after Thanksgiving and stated that he would have to miss the Treasure Coast and Jupiter Tequesta shows that weekend. His wife had a severe eye infection which was threatening her vision in that eye. Jerry was very worried as would be anyone. He had never missed an assignment in all of his years judging. I assured him the clubs would understand and that we would handle everything. With the help of the respective chairperson, Michael Sauve (American Kennel Club Representative), and our superintendent, Tonya Jordan, the situation was resolved and I called Jerry and told him not to worry. He is such a nice person and is a good and popular judge. My best thoughts are with Mrs. Watson for a speedy recovery.

Musings

It’s Christmas and I’m sitting here in my office running my I.V. antibiotics for my foot infection and working on show layouts for some of our January shows in Ohio and Florida. I, for some reason, thought of the following question which will require an answer from my more religious friends. If Christmas is abbreviated Xmas, does the X mean Christ and if so why? Please educate me. I’m not particularly religious, but I did make straight A’s in three courses on the history of religion, but I don’t know the answer to this question. Tap Dancers

This is an addendum to my last article (December) in which I got on a tap dancing fetish. I totally forgot Eleanore Powell, the first movie female tap dancer, who did solos as well as being a partner of Fred Astaire. She was also well known for her “Lady Be Good” and “Fascinating woman routines.” I also did not include Micky Rooney’s dances with Judy Garland. There was also a woman who’s last name was I believe McCracken? I need help.

Walton Tale

Many years ago we did the McKinley show on a Friday at the Ravenna Kennel Club Show on the Riddle Field Show site, then moved to the Columbiana show site and then came back to Riddle Field for the Rubber City show. Well, at the end of the McKinley show, we headed for the Columbiana show. Our truck left a little ahead of us with Jerry Jordan driving; he was accompanied by a helper named Donald Williams.

As we were heading up the road, I said to Bill (Bill Hackett, one of our superintendents, who was riding with me), that looks like a truck overturned in the ditch. As we got closer, I realized it was ours. The wheels were still spinning and the engine was smoking. We stopped and the cab door opened and out crawled Jerry and Donald. Donald kept repeating, “Jer, are you O.K.?” Donald was a light complexed black man, but at the moment he was ashen and was whiter than Jerry. I’ve had many close black friends in my life both in school and the armed forces, but had never seen any of them turn white with fear. Jerry, while driving, lit a cigarette and accidentally dropped it between his legs. In attempting to retrieve it, he lost control of the truck and went off the road on the left side and up an embankment where he encountered a 100 year old oak tree. He bounced off the tree back across the road and overturned in the ditch. We had equipment all over the road and with the help of some vendors, we loaded it in their trucks and they took it to Columbiana.

In the meantime, the police arrived and one of them commented to me that the old oak tree had never lost a war to a car or truck. The police called a wrecker company and upon arrival, they hooked a cable to their aluminum box and attempted to upright the truck and promptly tore the box right off the frame. I then realized why they were called wreckers.

I often wonder if the owners of the oak tree (who were not home) ever knew what had happened? Bill and I proceeded on to Columbiana and went immediately to their club dinner which we promised not to miss. As we were very late, they were very upset, but understood why after hearing our saga. I don’t remember some of the old members, but remembered Bill Cunahan who I believe was President and Bob Krohe (now deceased) and I believe Shirley Hitter was there. We totaled the truck as the repair estimates were twice the cost of a replacement. Every time I go to Ravenna I pass that old 100 year oak which we have named “Jerry’s tree.”

continued next page..... Definitions

What is the difference between a noun and a pronoun? A Pronoun does for money what a noun does for free. - Tim The Toolman on Home Improvement T.V. sitcom.

Don Criqui CBS Sports Quotes

Golf is a game that prolongs the lives of useless people.

“I have a friend who is a veterinarian and taxidermist that way you are guaranteed to get your dog back one way or the other.”

Question

Do you know why mules drop out of school?

Answer

No one likes smart asses.

That’s all for now folks!!!

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Letters to the Newsletter

FROM: HOWARD NYGOOD

DATE: 1 JANUARY 1999

Thanks for the article “A Brief History of Morris & Essex” published in the November, 1998 Newsletter. We hope to create lots of interest in the revival of this classic show, and your help is very much appreciated.

There is one correction, however - The written history is correct, but you were inadvertenly sent the wrong picture. The dog in the photo is the 1935 Morris & Essex Best in Show Winner, “CH. Milson O’ Boy”, owned at the time by Mrs. Cheever Porter.

Sincerely,

Howard Nygood

Do you have an Idea, an Observation or an Experience
that may be of interest or help to other Clubs?

Contact us by mail:

MB-F Newsletter

PO Box 22107

Greensboro, NC 27420

or by E-mail: mbf@infodog.com

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“WINNERS & BRAGGING RIGHTS"

FACT: InfoDog’s web site averages 97529 hits per day!

If you are a registered member of InfoDog’s “Winners & Bragging Rights”program;

1. As an exhibitor, you would have a program that would keep a complete record of wins including points for every dog you show, all with little or no effort on your part.

2. As an exhibitor, you would have a full-page web-site record on the Internet, for every dog you show, kept current with little or no effort on your part.

3. As an exhibitor, you would have a full-page ad with a photo of your dog on the Web every time you win any class from Puppy all the way to Best in Show, all with little or no effort on your part.

4. As a breeder, you would have with little effort on your part your own full page web-site with photos on the Internet which would activate every time a dog of your breeding, regardless of owner, chalks up a win.

5. As a handler, you would have a full-page web-site on the Internet with photos depicting your wins from week to week with little or no effort on your part.

6. As a breeder, you would have a full-page ad with photo on the Net where you could sell puppies that will show and win.

7. As an exhibitor, you would be able to look for and find For Sale promising show prospects with photos from recognized breeders

8. As an exhibitor, breeder, handler or interested spectator, you would have a place on the Internet that automatically keeps up with all of the latest wins at all shows.

Whatever your interest, all of the above is soon to become reality at InfoDog’s “Winners & Bragging Rights” on the World Wide Web. How much will it cost? Very little, a one- time $5.00 registration fee per dog and a $3.00 win fee for the highest win of that dog at any show. This buys the automatic record keeping, a photo and a full-page web ad for as long as you show the dog and it continues winning. For breeders, the coverage is great; it can lead to many laurels for breeders of winning dogs. It will build their reputations as top breeders, something now lacking in the recognition of top breeders. For handlers, it is advertising in the true sense. It puts in perspective those that can win and those that can not. For exhibitors, it keeps up with the current action week by week and highlights their dogs as winners. VERY SOON, all of this will become reality. KEEP POSTED ON INFODOG FOR MORE NEWS about this exciting new program.

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INFODOG BREEDERS CUP

InfoDog announced today that it would sponsor a Breeders Cup Award competition on a yearly basis. It will be controlled through the new program recently introduced by InfoDog known as WINNERS AND BRAGGING RIGHTS.

Briefly, the program will be open to all breeders registered in the Winners and Bragging Rights program. The entire program will be monitored automatically by InfoDog on a weekly basis. The results will be posted each week with every win of every dog of the breeder being shown. The basic criteria for winning this award will be as follows.

1. The total number of wins of breeders’ dogs regardless of ownership. All wins will be posted on a weekly basis and count toward the total wins.

2. The total number of Champions of breeders’ stock finished each year from January 1st through December 31st, regardless of owner.

3. Total number of breeders’ stock having points towards championships at year’s end, regardless of owner.

4. The total number of Group wins of breeders’ stock 1st through 4th during the year, regardless of owner.

5. Number of BIS wins.

6. Full details of the scoring system will be released in the near future.

A perpetual Silver Loving Cup will be engraved with the breeder’s name, the year and the winning breed and/or breeds. The cup will remain on display at a prominent site until the following Year when it will be passed on to the new breeder of the year and so on into perpetuity. A suitable engraved replica will be given each year to the top breeder for permanent possession. In addition, the next five runners-up in this competition will be awarded certificates for their achievements.

A program of this sort has been a long time in the coming. It is our hope that it will be acceptable to all those breeding and showing dogs. We further hope that it will be embraced as a proper reward to those breeders who are truly the pillars of our sport. It is sad and regrettable that this award could not be retroactive to include those exceptional breeders of our past. Much of our heritage has been lost in our attitudes of instant gratification not being soon enough.

This award will be presented each year at a top show.

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INFODOG TOP HANDLER OF THE YEAR CUP

InfoDog announced today that it would sponsor a Top Handler of the Year Award competition on a yearly basis. It will be controlled through the new program being introduced shortly by InfoDog known as WINNERS AND BRAGGING RIGHTS.

Briefly, the program will be open to all PHA, DHG and CPH handlers registered in the Winners and Bragging Rights program. The entire program will be monitored automatically by InfoDog on a weekly basis. The results will be posted each week with every win of each registered handler showing dogs in this program. The basic criteria for winning this award will be as follows.

1. The total number of wins of registered handlers at each show they attend. All wins will be posted on a weekly basis and count toward the total wins.

2. The total number of Champions finished each year from January 1st through December 31st.

3. Total number of dogs having points towards Championships at year’s end.

4. The total number of Group wins 1st through 4th during the year.

5. Number of BIS wins.

6. The Handler’s documented history and participation in programs supporting and promoting the sport in general as well as the handling profession.

7. Full details of the scoring system will be released in the near future.

A perpetual Silver Loving Cup will be engraved with the Top Handler’s name, the year and the winning award. The cup will remain on display in a prominent location until the following year when it will be passed on to the new Handler of the year. A suitable engraved replica will be given each year to the top Handler for permanent possession. In addition, the next five runners-up will be awarded a certificate of their achievements.

A program of this apolitical sort has also been a long time in the coming. It is our hope that it will be acceptable to all Professional Handlers and all persons involved in showing dogs. We further hope that it will be embraced as a proper reward to those Handlers that work for the betterment of their profession and are a vital part of our sport.

The presentation of this award will be made each year at a top show.

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INFODOG EXHIBITOR OF THE YEAR CUP

InfoDog announced today that it would sponsor an Exhibitor of the Year Award competition on a yearly basis. It will be controlled through a new program being introduced shortly by InfoDog known as”WINNERS AND BRAGGING RIGHTS”.

Briefly, the program will be open to all exhibitors registered in the Winners and Bragging Rights program. The entire program will be monitored automatically by InfoDog on a weekly basis. The results will be posted each week with every win of each registered Exhibitor showing dogs in this program. Dogs may be professionally or owner handled. The basic criteria for winning this award will be as follows:

1. The total of highest posted win from each show attended. All wins will be posted on a weekly basis and count toward the total wins.

2. The total number of Champions finished each year from January 1st through December 31st.

3. Total number of dogs having points towards Championships at year’s end.

4. The total number of Group wins 1st through 4th during the year.

5. Number of BIS Wins.

6. Full details of the scoring system relative to the above categories will be released in the near future.

A perpetual Silver Loving Cup will be engraved with the Exhibitor’s name, the year and the winning award. The cup will remain in a prominent location until the following year when it will be passed on to the new Exhibitor of the Year. A suitable engraved replica will be given each year to the top Exhibitor for permanent possession. In addition the next five runners up will be awarded a certificate of their achievements.

A program of this apolitical sort has been a long time in the coming. It is our hope that it will be acceptable to all those persons involved in showing dogs. We further hope that it will be embraced as a proper reward for those persons that are the basic supporters of our sport.

This award will be presented at a top show at the beginning of each year.

 

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wpe9.jpg (1939 bytes)    The Shaggy Dog Stories

From A Dog’s Perspective

“Some days you’re the dog; some days you’re the hydrant.” — Unknown

“Whoever said you can’t buy happiness forgot about puppies.” — Gene Hill

“In dog years, I’m dead.” — Unknown

“Dogs feel very strongly that they should always go with you in the car, in case the need should arise for them to bark violently at nothing right in your ear.” — Dave Barry

“Outside of a dog, a book is probably man’s best friend; inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.” — Groucho Marx

“To his dog, every man is Napoleon; hence the constant popularity of dogs.” — Aldous Huxley

“A dog teaches a boy fidelity, perseverance, and to turn around three times before lying down.” — Robert Benchley “Did you ever walk into a room and forget why you walked in? I think that’s how dogs spend their lives.” — Sue Murphy

“I loathe people who keep dogs. They are cowards who haven’t got the guts to bite people themselves.” — August Strindberg

“No animal should ever jump up on the dining room furniture unless absolutely certain that he can hold his own in the conversation.” — Fran Lebowitz

“Ever consider what they must think of us? I mean, here we come back from a grocery store with the most amazing haul — chicken, pork, half a cow. They must think we’re the greatest hunters on earth!” — Anne Tyler

“I wonder if other dogs think poodles are members of a weird religious cult.” — Rita Rudner

“My dog is worried about the economy because Alpo is up to 99 cents a can. That’s almost $7.00 in dog money.” — Joe Weinstein

“If I have any beliefs about immortality, it is that certain dogs I have known will go to heaven, and very, very few persons.” — James Thurber

“You enter into a certain amount of madness when you marry a person with pets.” — Nora Ephron

“Don’t accept your dog’s admiration as conclusive evidence that you are wonderful.” — Ann Landers

“Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.” — Robert A. Heinlein

“In order to keep a true perspective of one’s importance, everyone should have a dog that will worship him and a cat that will ignore him.” — Dereke Bruce, Taipei, Taiwan

“Of all the things I miss from veterinary practice, puppy breath is one of the most fond memories!” — Dr. Tom Cat

“There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.” — Ben Williams

“When a man’s best friend is his dog, that dog has a problem.” — Edward Abbey

“Cat’s motto: No matter what you’ve done wrong, always try to make it look like the dog did it.” — Unknown

“Money will buy you a pretty good dog, but it won’t buy the wag of his tail.” — Unknown

“No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as the dog does.” — Christopher Morley

“A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more than he loves himself.” — Josh Billings

“Man is a dog’s idea of what God should be.” — Holbrook Jackson

“The average dog is a nicer person than the average person.” — Andrew A. Rooney

“He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion.” — Unknown

“If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you; that is the principal difference between a dog and a man.” — Mark Twain

“Things that upset a terrier may pass virtually unnoticed by a Great Dane.” — Smiley Blanton

“I’ve seen a look in dogs’ eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt, and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts.” — John Steinbeck

(Submitted by Angela Porpora, via internet)

Humor is a good thing.

If you have a favorite doggy laff
-- particularly a true story --
please send it in and share a good laff with fellow dog enthusiasts.

Send to:

MB-F, Inc.
c/o The Shaggy Dog
P.O. Box 22107
Greensboro, NC 27420

e-mail: http://www.infodog.com

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A Questionnaire for everyone...

FACT: Infodog's web site averages 97529 hits per day!

1. As an exhibitor, how would you like a program that would keep a complete record of wins including points for every dog you show, all with little or no effort on your part?

2. As an exhibitor, how would you like a full-page web-site ad on the Internet, for every dog you show, kept current and with little or no effort on your part?

3. As an exhibitor, how would you like to have a full-page ad with a photo of your dog on the Web every time you win any class from puppy all the way to best in show, all with little or no effort on your part?

4. As a breeder, with little effort on your part, how would like to have your own full page web-site with photos on the Internet which would activate every time a dog of your breeding, regardless of owner, chalks up a win?

5. As a handler, how would you like a full-page web-site on the Internet with photos depicting your wins from week to week with little or no effort on your part?

6. As a breeder, how would you like a full-page ad with photo on the Net where you could sell puppies that will show and win?

7. As an exhibitor, how would you like to be able to look for and find For Sale a promising show prospect with photo from a recognized breeder?

8. As an exhibitor, breeder, handler or an interested spectator, how would you like to have a place on the Internet that automatically keeps up with all of the latest wins at all shows?

Whatever your interest, all of the above is soon to become a reality at InfoDog on the World Wide Web. How much will it cost? Very little, a one time $5.00 registration fee per dog and a $3.00 win fee for the highest win at any show. This buys the automatic record keeping, a photo and a full-page web ad for as long as you show the dog and it continues winning. For breeders, the coverage is great; it can lead to many laurels for breeders of winning dogs. It will build their reputation as a top breeder, something now lacking in the recognition of top breeders. For handlers, it is advertising in the true sense. It puts in perspective those that can win and those that can not. For exhibitors, it keeps up with the current action week by week and highlights their dogs as winners. VERY SOON, all of this will become reality. KEEP POSTED ON INFODOG FOR MORE NEWS on this exciting new program.

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